The Visitant

It has been so long since the last time I smelled these pages! Metaphorically speaking, of course; please, don’t panic.) Life (and, more often, my own mind; alas!) get in the way. It’s not as though I’ve stopped reading, no. I promise you I’ve put in as many “prone hours” with my nose in some […]

Of Byomkesh Bakshi and other mysteries

I wonder how many of you remember the days of DoorDarshan (that’s National television in India and what some of us fondly refer to as pre-cable days). Ah, now those were the days! When television was basically about a few (read, 3) good shows and endless hours of News delivered in that beautiful newsreader monotone […]

I’ll Be Seeing You

Meghan Collins, a rookie reporter, is on an assignment in a busy casualty department of a New York hospital when a young mugging victim is brought in. Stripped of her identity, there’s no way to tell who the hapless victim was or where she came from but the sight of her sends a chill through Meghan … the victim looks just like her! Continue reading “I’ll Be Seeing You”

Let Me Call You Sweetheart

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A murder is committed and a man’s paying for it with his life. In any criminal justice system in the world, this would be an ideal scenario; justice has been served, victim’s been avenged, society has been paid its dues, victory for all. Perfect.

But then you discover the “victim” wasn’t quite such an innocent and the man behind bars might be the wrong one entirely. Then, what? Continue reading “Let Me Call You Sweetheart”

The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunnits

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I picked up this book quite by chance when I found it at a sale simply because I thought it would present an interesting new angle on murder mysteries. Edited by Mike Ashley this book is a compilation of about 24 stories, some written as far back as the 1800s.

Now, I’m not particularly well-versed with the rather expansive and pretty complicated British history (their contribution to Indian history was hard enough to learn in school) so Ashley’s foreword was well appreciated. Nonetheless, there were a few names even I recognised, most prominently Sir Walter Ralegh, Pocahontas (!), and of course, the King’s Players as Shakespeare and his company were known then. Continue reading “The Mammoth Book of Jacobean Whodunnits”